Da Vinci pro 1.0



  • @dc42:

    Thanks for the write up! Can you post photos of the original endstop sensors, so that i can see whether it might be possible to modify them to work with the Duet?

    Thank you, I threw the old ones away maybe timsamsony can supply photos. There is absolutely no markings on them and I tried wiring in all directions. I figured it must be a voltage issue.

    I am sure there will be more people interested in doing this conversion as it applies to Davinci Pro 1.0 and Davinci 1.0/1.0A and possibly others. Any chance you want to add it to the wiki after modifying the parts about the ribbon cable with your knowledge 🙂


  • administrators

    Thanks so much for the write-up. I have moved this to the " My Duet WiFi-controlled machine" part of the forum as hopefully more people can see it!

    For now I have linked it from the tutorial page of the wiki:
    https://duet3d.com/wiki/Tutorials#Setup



  • @dc42:

    Thanks for the write up! Can you post photos of the original endstop sensors, so that i can see whether it might be possible to modify them to work with the Duet?

    Here are some pictures of a da VInci 1.0 Pro stock end stop. This one is from the Y axis, but it looks like all three axes use the same.






  • Looks like a pretty standard IR emitter/detector combo - power, ground and input should be doable.



  • They don't trigger on the Duet, I tried switching the wires around too. His at least are marked, mine were blank only traces.

    Thanks bdwalker


  • administrators

    Thanks for the photos. Unless there is a resistor hidden in the plastic, that optical endstop needs a resistor of about 150 to 330 ohms added in series with the connection that feeds 3.3V from the centre pin of the Duet endstop connector to the IR emitter. If 3.3V is fed directly to the IR emitter then it will burn out. With the resistor and the correct connections, it should work.



  • @dc42:

    Thanks for the photos. Unless there is a resistor hidden in the plastic, that optical endstop needs a resistor of about 150 to 330 ohms added in series with the connection that feeds 3.3V from the centre pin of the Duet endstop connector to the IR emitter. If 3.3V is fed directly to the IR emitter then it will burn out. With the resistor and the correct connections, it should work.

    Just for sake of learning, how would someone determine that requirement when looking at a simple PCB like this one. I bought myself a starter kit for arduino so I can begin learning these types of things but I am not there yet.

    So far as much as I know is how to follow traces and use multimeter for testing and some basic soldering skills



  • I updated the origional post to include a link to pre-loaded igus bearings for 8mm shafts. This is in USA, they can be had cheaper in Europe… you will want the pre-loaded ones like these as the full bearings need a compression fit to work properly

    https://www.amazon.com/Igus-RJZM-01-08-DryLin-Straight-Bearing/dp/B00QZ7YJ54

    Now we just need a good left and right y carriage that works with these bearings.


  • administrators

    @Whitewolf:

    @dc42:

    Thanks for the photos. Unless there is a resistor hidden in the plastic, that optical endstop needs a resistor of about 150 to 330 ohms added in series with the connection that feeds 3.3V from the centre pin of the Duet endstop connector to the IR emitter. If 3.3V is fed directly to the IR emitter then it will burn out. With the resistor and the correct connections, it should work.

    Just for sake of learning, how would someone determine that requirement when looking at a simple PCB like this one. I bought myself a starter kit for arduino so I can begin learning these types of things but I am not there yet.

    So far as much as I know is how to follow traces and use multimeter for testing and some basic soldering skills

    The main part of the black component is a slotted opto switch. The switch comprises an infrared LED on one side of the slot and a phototransistor on the other side. Like any LED, the one in a slotted opto switch needs a series resistor to control the current through it. I don't see any resistor in the photo. So I suspect that the original main board for that printer includes the resistors. The Duet (like other general-purpose 3D printer control boards) is designed to be compatible with a wide range of homing sensors of different types, so it doesn't include a resistor in series with the 3.3V pin.



  • I know this is an old thread, but I figured I would post to it in case anyone else wants to modify their DaVinci with a DuetWifi. I can confirm that adding a 300ohm resistor in series with the "A" pin (anode…3.3V) on the DaVinci allows it to work perfectly. I have the original DaVinci endstops working with the resistor.

    The AGC pins on the endstop are A is 3.3V, G is ground and C is the Stop signal. It turns out the pinout was also way off, but easy enough to figure out by probing both sides with a DMM.


  • administrators

    Thanks for letting us know.


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