Need your opinion on Stepper Motors



  • I currently own a Tevo Black Widow. Its a great printer, but with any printer out there, it has some drawbacks.

    My question to you is which type of stepper motor is better for making prints look amazing, but also want you opinions on the drawbacks

    I am looking to move over from the Stock 1.8 degree stepper motors to 0.9 degree stepper motors.

    And go....

    Also, thank you all in advance for you comments and opinions on this matter.

    I put my complaints about my printer on the bottom for anyone that is thinking about getting a Black Widow 3D Printer.

    For instance, it only has one Z-Axis motor that controls both Z-Axis rods. It uses a belt to connect both rods together.

    The X-Axis had a very very heavy extruder stepper motor with a 3 to 1 gearbox along with it.

    The Y-Axis motor I feel is underpowered.

    I have changed the X-Axis and went to a bowden setup, which really lightened up the load the X-Axis stepper motor was having to put out.

    Karma





  • Thank you for this info. I didn't see it until you gave me the link. Thank you again

    Karma



  • @Karma said in Need your opinion on Stepper Motors:

    For instance, it only has one Z-Axis motor that controls both Z-Axis rods. It uses a belt to connect both rods together.

    Is this a down side? I had the impression that this is the more technically sound design compared to two Z motors my printer has.

    The X-Axis had a very very heavy extruder stepper motor with a 3 to 1 gearbox along with it.

    I think that direct extruders with 3/1 gearbox are the common trend now (BMG, Hemera, etc). Do you mean that the stepper is two heavy than needed? If so I recommend LDO 42STH25-1404MAC (got the recommendation here and works great for me).



  • @zapta Thank you for your response and information you have given.

    I have already taken off the factory extruder stepper motor and replaced it with a BMG Bondtech setup via Bowden. I am attempting to reduce as much weight as possible off each Axis. In doing so, I will be able to increase the acceleration setting of the X and Y axis, thus improve print quality and lower overall print time.

    I know that the 0.9 degree motors holding torque is reduced because of them being 0.9 degrees. I have also thought of adding a second stepper motor on both X and Y axis to help out the strength. But in doing so, I am thinking that I would have to buy a duex5 for the increased amount of stepper drivers.

    Another question I would like to know is of it is possible to replace the TMC2660 stepper drivers with the newer TMC5161. Mainly for the increased amps available for each stepper motor that comes with the TMC5161. I understand that it would require me to do some soldering. I already have a soldering re-work station and I am pretty good at SMD soldering and also under a soldering microscope.

    But I am unsure if the TMC2660 and TMC5161 share the very same pinout, and if so, what else would have to be changed out on the board to compliment the added amp's per driver.

    I know that I am asking a bunch of questions, but I love learning about how each different component works and how they interact with each other for them to work.

    Again, Thank you for the info on the stepper motor for the extruder. I will have to look into that motor as a viable option vs my Bowden setup now.

    Karma



  • @Karma said in Need your opinion on Stepper Motors:

    Another question I would like to know is of it is possible to replace the TMC2660 stepper drivers with the newer TMC5161. Mainly for the increased amps

    I doubt if this is practical but I don't know for sure. I don't know which board you are using but IIRC the duet 3 supports higher currents. I am happy with the duet Wifi and it's a good fit to my 300mm corexy.



  • @Karma said in Need your opinion on Stepper Motors:

    ....................... I am attempting to reduce as much weight as possible off each Axis. In doing so, I will be able to increase the acceleration setting of the X and Y axis, thus improve print quality and lower overall print time.

    That's a common misconception which only applies to non-print moves. For the majority of moves which involve pushing molten filament through a small nozzle, the speed is governed by how fast you can accelerate the melt rate and extrude the filament. Even at modest accelerations, there is a lag between the carriage and the extruded filament which results in a pressure build up in the hot end before that translates into more filament being extruded from the nozzle. Pressure advance will help to compensate but only up to a point.
    Ultimately print move accelerations are determined by the rate that the filament flowing through a tiny nozzle can be accelerated. So although lowering the mass might in theory allow you to use higher XY acceleration, you won't be able to make us of that acceleration unless the molten filament flow rate can keep up.
    In a nutshell, carriage mass is not a limiting factor for print moves, so reducing it will only benefit the acceleration for non-print moves and thus have very little effect on reducing overall print time. Higher carriage acceleration will almost certainly not improve print quality due to the lag between the change in carriage velocity and the velocity of the filament coming out of the nozzle. The lower mass may also make "ringing" worse due to the reduced damping effect.


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