Zortrax M200 Duet Conversion


  • administrators

    Yes you can put a printed cover over the WiFi antenna to protect it.

    I suggest you move the wire that goes to the centre tag on the end stop switch to the other outer tag if you can. It looks to me like a slide-on spade connector, so this should be easy to do. Then you will be using the common and NC switch contacts. At the Duet end of the cable, connect the two wires to the outer pins of the 3 pin endstop connector.



  • @dc42:

    Yes you can put a printed cover over the WiFi antenna to protect it.

    I suggest you move the wire that goes to the centre tag on the end stop switch to the other outer tag if you can. It looks to me like a slide-on spade connector, so this should be easy to do. Then you will be using the common and NC switch contacts. At the Duet end of the cable, connect the two wires to the outer pins of the 3 pin endstop connector.

    Yes they are mini spades on the end stop switch and that will be easy to do.

    I'm actually tempted to install the board with upside down to the way the original one is, ie with the plugs all facing upward so that when the cover with the 70mm fan is bolted in it would be blowing on the underside of the board, which is where I see you want the cooling directed. It would just be a bit of a tight fit, but the fan would be all factory fit.

    I possibly could open up the ventilation fins on one side and poke the antenna out a bit (how much is needed?), and if I made a nice fascia it would allow access to the micro usb plug/sd card/reset buttons and I might even be able to have the little led's visible…I'll look into it.


  • administrators

    You seldom need to access the USB,SD card slot, reset or erase buttons once you are up and running but if you can make them accessible then you might save yourself having to get to the underside of the printer at a later date



  • @T3P3Tony:

    You seldom need to access the USB,SD card slot, reset or erase buttons once you are up and running but if you can make them accessible then you might save yourself having to get to the underside of the printer at a later date

    I'd only be doing it because I was already making a slot for the antenna.

    Is there any chance wifi would work if I kept the antenna inside the aluminium housing, and if not how far should it protrude.

    As well as some slightly difficult metalwork I'm worried about a bump snapping the board, even with a printed cover.


  • administrators

    Perhaps you could cut a hole in the metalwork and put the antenna below it, without it protruding? Then a flat plastic cover over the hole.

    Whether it works as-is will depend on how far away your WiFi access point is.



  • Just an idea but why not simply cut the antenna trace on the ESP and tack on a coax pigtail that's terminated with a panel-mount SMA-RP connector? Then you could connect a cheap external antenna. If you keep the coax short any losses in the cable should easily be made up for with improved antenna gain.



  • I forget which, but a specific certification authority requires a built-in antenna for conformity. This is why.



  • Ah, that's a good point.

    And yet the governing bodies seem to happily grant certification to Powerline Network Adapters that create massive amounts of broad-band interference I can hear on the HF bands for miles…but I digress.

    I did some quick looking and at least here in the states the ESP seems to be available with both a ceramic antenna and u.FL connector already on-board that's FCC/CE certified:

    http://store.hackaday.com/products/esp8266-07-module-with-u-fl-chip-antenna-fcc-ce-certified


  • administrators

    Interesting! We made a few Duet WiFi prototypes using modified ESP-07 modules instead of the ESP-12F that we normally use. However, I have not seen any evidence anywhere else that the ESP-07 can be FCC certified.



  • It really would be awesome to be able to have an antenna mounted on the top or side or the printer.

    This would allow the DuetWifi to be fitted to any type of printer with a metal cabinet.

    I'm just waiting for my bootlace kit and crimper and I'll mount it all up.

    Simple little things like needing 4mm standoffs instead of the Zortrax 3mm's are pain in the arse surprises, but I'm onto it and will print some temporary ones to get started.

    I might start by mounting the board with the antenna facing the ventilation slots and see how that goes.

    Do i really need the fan blowing on the underside of the board? Weren't the drivers tested with no cooling fan at all?



  • Bootlace kit and crimper turned up today, and makes nice neat work of putting the twin power supply and heat bed cables into the Duets terminal blocks.

    School holidays in Oz, so I'd better put it all aside for a week or two or I'll get into trouble.

    I'll be replacing the (prone to fail) ribbon cable with silicone insulated wires in braided sheath up to the hot end, and am wondering what sizes to go with.

    I've got 24AWG which should be ample for the extruder stepper, fans, IR probe and thermocouple (or possibly PT100), but will it be heavy enough for the 24v heater element? Next size up I've got here is 18AWG which is quite a bit heavier.


  • administrators

    From http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/wire-gauges-d_419.html it looks to me that 24awg should be OK if your heater power is 40W or less.



  • Absolutely loving this engineer PA-09 crimping tool!

    How good is this on 24AWG silicone wire…no more recycling/soldering old plugs etc!



  • Can anyone tell me what this plug into the extruder stepper motor is, and even better point me to a link where to buy them and a decent size bag of crimp pins?

    I've been screwed by mouser/digikey etc before where I thought I was getting a bag of pins and they were price individually and the range of choices can be confusing at best.



  • @dc42:

    I suggest you move the wire that goes to the centre tag on the end stop switch to the other outer tag if you can. It looks to me like a slide-on spade connector, so this should be easy to do. Then you will be using the common and NC switch contacts. At the Duet end of the cable, connect the two wires to the outer pins of the 3 pin endstop connector.

    Correct on the limit switch.

    Moving the center tab to the outside gives you normally closed (open when activated) operation.

    At the Duet board end, if I use the 2 outer pins I'm across "GND" and "STP", and "3.3v" is left with no connection.

    Just confirming that's the way you want it connected?

    Another question would be how do I determine the pins for the stepper motors, or is it just a case of reversing 2 wires if it's traveling in the wrong direction?

    It seems the stepper connection is a 6 way JST-PH, by the way.


  • administrators

    Yes that's the correct end stop switch wiring.

    For the motors, you need to pair the phase wires, but you can reverse the directions using the M569 commands in config.g if you don't want to touch the wiring.



  • @dc42:

    Yes that's the correct end stop switch wiring.

    For the motors, you need to pair the phase wires, but you can reverse the directions using the M569 commands in config.g if you don't want to touch the wiring.

    Sorry…please explain "pair the phase wires" and how I would do that.

    I have a multimeter handy if that will help me identify the pairs.


  • administrators

    I assume your motors have 4 wires each. Find a pair of wires that have a few ohms of resistance between them. Those wires are one phase. The other pair of wires are the other phase - they will have the same resistance between them, and near infinite resistance between them and the first pair. Connect the two wires of one phase to the two pins near one end of the 4-pin connector on the Duet, and the other phase to the two pins near the other end.

    The wires will probably be colour coded, and I suggest you use the same order of colours for all your motors.

    HTH David



  • Cheers, I actually thought that was it, thanks for confirming.

    They used all black wire, but I'll chase it visually and double check with the meter.



  • Moving along nicely, just waiting on silly little bits like standoffs, wire, fans, odds/sods.

    Looking like a fairly straight forward swap with plenty of room in the electrical compartment.

    I'll replace the K type thermocouple with an S3D PT100/daughter board I've got sitting here as the existing thermocouple only has short wires which I understand can't be extended, probably just in 2 wire configuration as I have the Molex plugs it's fitted with. UNLESS there's a compelling reason to use 4 wires on the PT100? Any suggestions on wire gauge for the sensor?

    Existing extruder heater I'm assuming is 40w/24v, so 20AWG (even 22AWG) silicone wire with a microfit 3.0 plug will easily handle the current, so that's all good.

    The heat bed is a bit of a bugger as Zortrax has some unique features there:

    1. It uses nozzle contact pads to set nozzle height and level check. This feature is pretty good actually, and the only way it goes wrong is if the nozzle is very dirty with built up carbon. I wouldn't mind using it in conjunction with the IR sensor, but I'm guessing it's normally open then closed on contact with the pad, where the DuetWifi uses normally closed limit switching?

    2. It unplugs at the back and sits on magnets so it can be lifted out on print completion. This is an awesome feature that I want to keep. Just so handy for removing prints without stressing the Z axis.

    3. The PCB bed heater appears to be glued to the back of the ally part of the build plate. It doesn't want to come off, and I don't want to damage it. It appears to have a 100k thermistor (measuring 95k on my meter) which I'm assuming will plug straight up to the DuetWifi and has the wiring incorporated in the existing loom already. The bed heater measures 3.6 ohms, so I'm at 6-7 amps @ 24v? Easy work for the Duet then at half its rated current?

    I was going to do away with the perfboard altogether and stick a sheet of Printbite straight onto the heated ally plate, but the plate is not very flat at all, which I guess is compensated by the fact that Zortrax software offers only raft printing.

    What I'm thinking of doing is setting it all up with the IR sensor, and just using the raft option with S3D for now.

    What would be nice in the future though would be a water jet cut cast ally plate 6-8mm thick with Printbite on top and a Keenovo heater in 240v, operated by an ACDC solid state relay. I'd get the plate cut will all the same mounting holes for the locating dowels, mounting magnets, etc so it would drop straight in. There's tonnes of room in the electrical compartment, and a big fan with plenty of ventilation, so that should be fine as well. I'd use a 4 pin 240v rated surface mount plug and make a new loom for the Keenovo mats power/thermistor.

    Just thinking out aloud…any suggestions?


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