It's what's on the inside right?



  • Ok hope you like this 3d print, which took 3 hours to print! Which is also good because before it took me 6 hours to print something smaller and wasn't this good. This would be called a lithophane and it's from a photo of when we went to New York City Central Park and more specifically Bethesda Terrence. This is the first high quality print and almost the first print I've made since I got my printer functional today. My printer used to be a 350 dollar Anycubic Delta Kossel with a Trigorilla board and I changed out the parts for DuetWifi and now it's not an Anycubic lol. So more like a 700 dollar Duet printerwith extra spare parts now lol.. I wanted to show you guys a cheap car with a really good engine could beat the race lol

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B4nxVsZnC01PVmhWem1sU3NxWEE


  • administrators

    Very nice!


  • administrators

    Can you tell us how you did that print?



  • @dc42:

    Can you tell us how you did that print?

    Hi, DC

    Here is a how to
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y63sVpeViXo&t=1s
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y63sVpeViXo&t=1s



  • I can see I'll have to give that a go !


  • administrators

    I've got a print going already! I hope it works with light green filament, because that's what is in my printer at present.



  • Thanks!

    Pick a photo with high resolution with high contrast. Works best with white filament. I recommend turning it upright and not laying it down flat. Use a brim with 20 lines. I like the website idea, but maybe you don't want to upload your photo to a website. Also when I choose curve I really don't have a choice to turn photo 90 degrees that I can see..

    I am using cura sometimes to slice but it doesn't do boarders. I use a program called Lithophanes.. Then import it into Cura for scaling.
    http://www.imprimindo3d.com.br/software-para-impressao-de-lithophanes/

    I will just suggest you use the Lithophane program even though you can do the same thing from cura. Cura doesn't seem to do it as well. Again Lithophane seems to work best and you can export to whatever you want to make gcode of the stl, not to mention scale and rotate. What seems to work best is to just import the photo then go straight to generate 3d file tab click generate 3d then save the stl file using the settings z 2mm base/thickness 2mm frame/edge/boarder .5mm and its going to need a comma rather than a decimal point because it's written in Russian or German whatever it is the system they use.. You can atleast change the language to English just not that math lol.

    On a side note I found that if I invert the picture it isn't a lithophane anymore but an actual 3d picture with light shined at it from the front and maybe at an angle.. In cura the setting isn't called inverted btw but they call it and give you two options (Light is higher) or (Dark is Higher)

    Back to the Lithophanes program. Make the z 2mm and if you have want a boarder/edge make it 2mm and the base/thinkness would need to be about .5mm My scaling in cura once I turned it upright have been about 80mm wide and height has been around 120mm and it takes close to 3 hours each time.

    I sometimes in Lithophanes program do 3mm and frame 3mm. Actually make sure both of those are the same if you want a frame.

    Also keep in mind that Base/thickness is the z value is at it's 0 (Lowest, Most Shallow) point.

    Sometimes your going to turn your photo sideways and you can pull the print brim off after. The picture I showed at top was done that way. So even on a smaller build area you can still get a 4 inch by 6 inch lithophane no problem. If you have the width build area to make 6 or more inches than leave the largest part on the bed because this will be faster than doing the largest part on height. Due to the printer having to move up and retract etc…..

    I'll try to work up a simple detailed how to tutorial. We are having to do that anyway. I am looking at this from a point of view for using a smaller build area which most people starting out 3d printing will most likely have. And then theres the time it takes and filiment usage....

    When scaling take into mind that your back of photo to front of photo should be kept the same so I would remember that value and scale it to whatever I want to print then unlock the value that syncs all XYZ and then only change that one value back to what it was which in this case should be between 2.5 and 3.5 mm (Z height + Base/Thickness from Lithopanes program)

    Remember in Lithopanes the values or direction names of values are based on if it's laying flat, but we will then turn it upright and hopefully that won't confuse people in talking about it because the value names of directions change.

    I started with this tutorial to be exact. She was doing them flat and a guy in the comments explained about sitting them up right taking advantage of X and Y towers. In my case XYZ is all the same since I'm using a delta but you get what I am saying. It's taking advantage of the ability to go in detail forward and back, left and right. Which creates better detail vs what your nozzel size can only accomplish due to it's width. I mean my nozzle size is .4mm so theres no way you can get detail smaller than that on the final layer going with flat printing. Your movements are finer than that moving on a horizontal plane. In my case mircostepping at 16x (256) interpolated steps correct?

    http://www.instructables.com/id/Litophanes-How-to-3D-Print-your-photos/

    Hopefully that is enough explaining for you to really get you going until I can put together something more solid with steps 🙂
    Hopefully I didn't confuse you all by repeating myself but just trying to make sure I give the best principal points of it all.

    dc42 I have found that using other colors you will need to push the limits for front of picture to back of picture. I think the smallest you can go would be your nozzle size. Which would be a total of in my case .4mm x 2 so (.8mm) (Base/Thickness + Z) Although only giving your detail a chance to create with only that much may not be enough to see detail.



  • Yeah great results:

    These things are a wonderful way to use a 3D printer, thanks for sharing.



  • @dc42:

    I've got a print going already! I hope it works with light green filament, because that's what is in my printer at present.

    How did the green turn out?


  • administrators

    @number40fan:

    @dc42:

    I've got a print going already! I hope it works with light green filament, because that's what is in my printer at present.

    How did the green turn out?

    It looks ok if there is a strong light behind it, but I'll switch to white filament next time.


 

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