80v-250v motors with Duet3 ?



  • I am building a larger than normal 3D printer and the motors are 130 Nema motors which have a voltage range of 80v to 250v, can these be used with my Duet3 ?



  • There is a thread detailing what you need to do to separate the motor supply voltage from the rest of the board, but I'm not sure how much higher you can go before isolation between traces and terminals become an issue; so in short I think the answer is "no".

    You'd be better off with external drivers I think, which will be supported by an expansion board at some time in the near-ish future.

    (unless you're asking if they can be run with the 30v or so the board is rated for, in which case, depends on speed and torque requirements)



  • Or buy a duet 2 and run that with external stepper drivers now


  • administrators

    @Space-Industries said in 80v-250v motors with Duet3 ?:

    I am building a larger than normal 3D printer and the motors are 130 Nema motors which have a voltage range of 80v to 250v, can these be used with my Duet3 ?

    The obvious answer is no; but can you provide a link to technical data for the motors you are considering?



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  • administrators

    Thanks. Unless you need to run them at insanely high speeds, you don't need as much as 80V to run those motors. I suggest you use our motor EMF calculator at https://www.reprapfirmware.org/ to find out what voltage you do need. It may well be that a Duet 3 powered from 24V or 32V will be sufficient.



  • Where are you seeing a voltage range of 80v to 250v?



  • @dc42 ok thanks, ill see how the current 12v version goes and get a 24v version if thats required



  • Highest rated voltage of those motors is 3.2V. To put that in perspective the Ormerod 2 ran 12V to V_IN fine with motors with a rated voltage of 2.8V. It's not the whole story though as inductance needs to be considered.

    Edit: 24V will be better, but complicates fans and heaters!

    Edit 2: "Rated Voltage" is the highest continous voltage you could apply to the coils without them exceeding design specifications.



  • To add a bit to DocTrucker's post, stepper motors are current driven. The driver supplies and limits the current. You increase the supply voltage to the drivers if you want to increase motor top speed (and torque). You do this primarily to overcome inductance of the motor.
    The 'Rated Voltage' DocTrucker refers to and that is listed in many specs is a different voltage from what you refer to. The spec sheet doesn't seem to say anything about 80-250 V so I am not sure where that comes from. They do list a 500V rating which is probably the absolute maximum before insulation break down.
    You notice that there is only a current rating in the specs rather than a voltage rating.
    I would suggest forgetting to run these motors at 12V and going straight to 24V


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