Thermal paste missing in V6 Kit or not needed anymore?



  • I received my effectors today, now I am asking myself if the thermal paste that usually comes with v6 all metal hotends is missing in my v6-kit or if it is not needed anymore because of the new design.

    I have enough left over from my previous head, so no worries here, just want to know if I need to apply it or not….

    Michael


  • administrators

    Yes it is worth applying thermal paste between the heat break and the heatsink if you have some.



  • I use automotive copper grease it has a very similar effect and also helps in removing parts later. I use it between heatsink and heatbreak, and around the heater cartridge, thermistor/pt100 (avoiding any near the electrical connections) and between nozzle and heatbreak. The only place to never apply any thermal transfer enhancer is between the heater block and heatbreak to discourage conduction here, in fact it would be nice if there was some sort of insulating material that could be applied to this one area.

    It will smoke slightly after application when the temperature rises beyond 160 deg, but it only does this once and it can be used at very high temperatures.


  • administrators

    Thanks for mentioning that I will let the packer know it was missing.





  • @DjDemonD:

    I use automotive copper grease it has a very similar effect and also helps in removing parts later. I use it between heatsink and heatbreak, and around the heater cartridge, thermistor/pt100 (avoiding any near the electrical connections) and between nozzle and heatbreak. The only place to never apply any thermal transfer enhancer is between the heater block and heatbreak to discourage thermal transfer here, in fact it would be nice if there was some sort of insulating material that could be applied to this one area.

    It will smoke slightly after application when the temperature rises beyond 160 deg, but it only does this once and it can be used at very high temperatures.

    great idea, I know most will be able to get those little packets of it. I have a large jar of it with a brush but it would last a 3D Printer a lifetime, lol



  • Yeah I have a sprayer and a big tub in the garage, but found a guy on ebay decanting it into 20g tins, bought one as its super convenient to leave in the box with my hotend spares.



  • @synergy41:

    Hello,
    What kind of dough can it be?

    https://www.amazon.fr/dp/B01N5Y6OMV/ref=asc_df_B01N5Y6OMV45314867/?tag=googshopfr-21&creative=22722&creativeASIN=B01N5Y6OMV&linkCode=df0&hvdev=c&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=

    Be careful you dont get thermal adhesive.
    They work like a compound, but you'll never get things apart in one piece 🙂

    I'm probably going to use copper paste as is used on bolts and on the backside of brake pads on cars.
    (If copper paste is a good solution).

    This might be a good solution that's pretty cheap.
    It works very good on cpu's
    http://www.arcticsilver.com/as5.htm

    -Jannis



  • Copper grease works great, enhances thermal transfer and enables easy dismantling. CPU compounds can work, but not all of them are rated to 300 deg C.



  • Thank you for the great tip, I was able to get copper grease in a local store, easy dismantling will be a big bonus….



  • @DjDemonD:

    Copper grease works great, enhances thermal transfer and enables easy dismantling. CPU compounds can work, but not all of them are rated to 300 deg C.

    Very good point.
    Arctic Silver is rated to max 180c, so that's definitely not a good fit 🙂

    -Jannis



  • Only use a very thin smear of the copper grease, not lashing of it, and heat the nozzle slowly after assembly to allow the solvent in it to evaporate away before it potentially reaches its flashpoint!



  • Following the instructions https://wiki.e3d-online.com/wiki/E3D-v6_Assembly the compound should only be applied on the threads of the heatsink (cold side). I think this area should never reach 180 Deg C so a 300degC rated would not be neccessary.

    Just for letting you know, the thermal compound was also not include in my order.



  • Yes the supplied thermal compound is quite safe to use as per instructions, but I wouldn't apply it anywhere else. Copper grease on the other hand is suitable for high temperatures.



  • Ref copper slip. I did some testing and a bit of a write up way back in July 2016 which I posted here http://forums.reprap.org/read.php?1,683821,683821#msg-683821. It's pretty good for putting around the heater cartridge.



  • I use copper slip on the studs that hold the exhaust manifold on my kit car - they get incredibly hot in use, and always come undone when required!

    I have no idea about its thermal conductivity characteristics, but it is good as a non-seize agent.



  • @David:

    …..........................
    I have no idea about its thermal conductivity characteristics, but it is good as a non-seize agent.

    See the link I posted above - it shows the difference in temperature rise with a heater cartridge with and without copper slip.



  • I like the idea of using it around the heater cartridge and maybe even the sensor. But I would like some good data verifying its thermal conductivity compared to thermal paste before using it on the heat breaks. I have used whatever thermal paste I had laying around on the heat breaks so far and not had any problem removing them. With good thermal transfer the temp should not get anywhere near as high as 180degC.



  • I have very good experiences with arctic silver compound on the cold end which shouldn't become hot at all.
    The copper paste can indeed be used on the hot end parts, but just use a very small amount. I use it quite some time now and I often run my Volcano at temperatures around 310°C.
    The grease burns away (hence the smoke and smell) and the copper particals remain.
    Copper is a very good conductor for heat and as it sits between the cartridges and the hot end body. The copper greatly eases the removal of the heater and sensor cartridges.

    I do not recommend to use the coppergrease for the cold end. It is a grease (!) and the heatbreak tends to sit loose in the cold end after a (short) while.



  • I have no experience of V6 hot ends but on my Diamond hot end, which uses one piece heat sinks (V6 lites I think), I use PTFE tape where the heat sink screws into the brass part, I'd guess this is what you guys refer to as the hot end side. It's mostly for sealing the joint as some Diamond users get leakage around this area, but I've never had a problem with blockages cause by heat creep that many Diamond users seem to get. Just a thought for you V6 users…........


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