My CoreXYUVAB as of today



  • Just published a YouTube video of my machine's current state of evolution if anyone is interested. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IG3AGKDzdH4.

    I've attempted to explain the machine without using words - hope it works. It's best viewed on something a bit bigger than a 'phone and better still with reasonable speakers. It'll take 10 minutes of your time to watch it.



  • Pretty darn impressive! Thanks for posting!



  • That's a nice video, thank you! I especially like the fact that all elements have their place, especially the Duet elements (hinged expansion boards) and wiring.


  • Moderator

    It's an impressive piece of machinery. I'd be interested in seeing more of the things you produce with it.



  • Thanks for sharing @deckingman! Curious about the nozzle wipe procedure. What is the material/thing that you are wiping the nozzle accross? Thanks again!



  • @mwolter said in My CoreXYUVAB as of today:

    Thanks for sharing @deckingman! Curious about the nozzle wipe procedure. What is the material/thing that you are wiping the nozzle accross? Thanks again!

    It's a strip of silicone rubber, pressed into a slot that I machined into a piece of aluminium.



  • Congratulations!!! .... is a monster !!!😁



  • I love the bit with the £1 coin 🙂



  • @robm said in My CoreXYUVAB as of today:

    I love the bit with the £1 coin 🙂

    Thanks. It shows that the load balancing gantry does what it's supposed to do - shame there are no gains in print quality though ☺



  • Excellent printer Ian, I love the attention to detail.

    There is a lot that can be learned from this printer you built.

    Congratulations!



  • @timcurtis67 said in My CoreXYUVAB as of today:

    ........................... There is a lot that can be learned from this printer you built.........................

    Thanks Tim. I hope people find it educational - that's the main reason why I publish this stuff on YouTube and my blog - so that others might learn something from my successes and failures.



  • @deckingman I find that I learn much more from failures. There is the added plus of the humbling that goes along with said failures....

    I've learned a bunch over my lifetime 😀 😀



  • @timcurtis67 Oh yes. Also, no matter how old one becomes, one never stops learning. Which means one never stops having failures. ☺

    There is a saying in the north or England that I quite like and which is "If tha's never made a mistake, tha's never made owt". Which translates into "If you've never made a mistake, it's because you've never made anything" ☺



  • @deckingman said in My CoreXYUVAB as of today:

    @timcurtis67 Oh yes. Also, no matter how old one becomes, one never stops learning. Which means one never stops having failures. ☺

    There is a saying in the north or England that I quite like and which is "If tha's never made a mistake, tha's never made owt". Which translates into "If you've never made a mistake, it's because you've never made anything" ☺

    A good old yorkshire saying Ian



  • @Dougal1957
    True.

    But the best sayings emanate from Newcastle. I married a (near enough) Geordie lass - took me ages to work out what ""How man, had ya pash, divvin' be a workyticket." meant.



  • @deckingman Jeez Ian I am not surprised lol



  • @deckingman Ian something OT, but I know you're interested in mutlicolor/multimaterial printing, this may be of interest for you: https://wyss.harvard.edu/news/multimaterial-3d-printing-manufactures-complex-objects-fast/



  • @JoergS5 Thanks for the link. Now that I like!

    Multi-colour/multi-material printing aside, I've always thought that there must be a better way of laying down molten plastic than trying to control what comes out of small nozzle by changing how we ram the stuff in to it. Replacing conventional extruders with fast switching solenoids is akin to how the internal combustion engine has evolved for using old "analogue" carburettors, which relied on a given (pulsating and variable density) air flow to "suck in" a given amount of fuel, to using electronically controlled fuel injection systems to deliver a very precise qantity of fuel based on information received from a vast array of sensors.

    I truly believe that the way forward is to do away with conventional extruders and replace them with something akin to what you linked.



  • Ian, I´v learnd a lot bevor from your blog. Special about multicolor and the Diamond Nozzle.

    Today, for me it worked not... often it is clogged and I don´t know why... not really.

    My Idea, special in mutimaterial printing is... only two materials... but with a very small nozzel.
    So the volum at the nozzle inside is extremly minimal.. and so ... perhaps... it´s possible to come like direct injektion.

    The 3-diamond nozzle contains whereby the 3 E3D´s more machanical space and therefor more Material.
    Equivalent bigger is your 5-Nozzle and so.. more material.

    If you thing about how many material come through the small hole in the front of the nozzle... you can imagine, wich impact has a little more volume at the inside.

    Thats my Idea for an very, very small Nozzle, with only two E3D and a very compact dimension.
    I don´t know if it´s right and if it works... but that my Idea.



  • I see the hot end with the metrol switch.
    Where have you find the soo small oil filled bronze bushes and steel dowels ?



  • @pipersw said in My CoreXYUVAB as of today:

    I see the hot end with the metrol switch.
    Where have you find the soo small oil filled bronze bushes and steel dowels ?

    I can't remember exactly - it was along time ago. They aren't difficult things to find and an internet search will likely throw up numerous suppliers. The bronze bushes go by the trade name of "Oilite" but if you put "Sintered bronze bushes" into a search engine it will likely turn something up. The ones I used were 6mm ID and something like 9mm OD and about 12mm long. The steel dowel pins are just that. I don't know of any other name for them. Just a steel pin with a chamfer at each end. The ones I used are 6mm diameter and about 16 mm long (I think).



  • I have to ask, so many wires, so many tubes, so many things emitting heat, how come you did not take the watercooling road ?



  • @arhi said in My CoreXYUVAB as of today:

    I have to ask, so many wires, so many tubes, so many things emitting heat, how come you did not take the watercooling road ?

    Err, not sure I understand the question 😕 . The complexity comes primarily from the fact that I have 6 extruders feeding a mixing hot end, and because it's biggish printer and I don't want Bowden tubes which would be over a metre long, I have chosen to mount the extruders on a separate moving (UV) gantry.

    There are only 2 primary sources of heat. The first is the bed heater - not much I can do about water cooling that as it needs to get hot.☺ The second is the Diamond hot end which has a single 40 watt heater cartridge. But it does have 5off modified E3D style heat sinks which are cooled by a single fan. These heat sinks could be water cooled but they fit in a tight circle with the fins almost touching each other, so there is no room to fit water jackets around them. But even if I could, I'd need to fit a radiator and pump somewhere, then run water pipes to the 5 heat sink jackets and return back to the pump. As well as wiring for the pump and probably extra temperature sensors, this would just add even more tubes and wires and gain nothing apart from replacing a single fan.

    The only other sources of heat are secondary. The Duet boards themselves but they are passively cooled and need neither fans nor water cooling. I did have a fan blowing onto the back of the main board but found it unnecessary so I've removed it. And the motors produce heat. But now that I've mounted the motors on aluminium mounts which in turn are bolted to the aluminium frame, this all acts like a giant heat sink so they too are passively cooled requiring neither fans nor water cooling.

    Edit. There is a water cooled varint of the Diamond 5 colour but even the inventor refers to it as experimental. Besides, it replaces a single fan with a pump, radiator and lots of tubing - not sure why I would want to do that as the printer sits in an unheated chamber.



  • That makes sense, you are not enclosing it so all the passive heat has where to leave and the single fan cools all those cold sides of that single hotend. I didn't expect that diamond is heated with only 40W. Thanks for clarification.



  • @arhi said in My CoreXYUVAB as of today:

    That makes sense, you are not enclosing it so all the passive heat has where to leave and the single fan cools all those cold sides of that single hotend. I didn't expect that diamond is heated with only 40W. Thanks for clarification.

    Actually, the stock 5 colour Diamond comes with a massive 80 watt heater which is just too powerful and "un-taimable". I've demonstrated printing at up to 300mm/sec using a 0.5mm nozzle and 0.3mm layer heigh using a 40 Watt heater, so it's more than adequate.


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