Zesty Nimble Direct Drive extruder launched on KS



  • Full disclosure I'm one of the creators of this, posting because I think it's likely of interest to many of you, hopefully thats ok?

    • Less than 33grams weight on the effector, stepper can be mounted remotely

    • Super simple unobstructed filament loading path

    • Tiny

    Zesty Nimble Extruder
    https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/lykle/super-light-and-easy-to-use-extruder-for-your-3d-p

    Have a look and if you like what you see, please help us to realise this goal by backing the campaign.
    Also, if you want, please share with anybody who might be interested.

    Thanks
    Brian



  • I'm backing them, I can vouch that flexible drive extruders work having tried the competition, and this one is simpler, looks easier to use and is even lighter.

    A delta/corexy must have. Useful for dual/triple extrusion on cartesian machines too I suspect.



  • yep pledged for a pair as well



  • Thanks for the support guys!



  • Me too yay



  • Let me know when you come up with a way to graft 3 of them on to a Diamond hot end and I might be tempted.


  • administrators



  • OK so I'm tempted. It's bloody huge though….......


  • administrators

    Yes - time for a bigger delta to accommodate it 😉



  • Oh I am tempted to increase my Pledge now to 4 of the things rather than 2 Think it would work well on my MegaBeast (1.5 tall 750mm horizontal extrusions).



  • Knowing how much the Diamond needs high air flow to cool the heat sinks, that ducting arrangement with the Nimbles encroaching into it would concern me a bit. I'd like to see some heat break temperature data or real world test results before I committed any hard earned.



  • It sounds like your hot end should be using a blower fan instead of an axial fan if you need high air flow with higher pressure.



  • I'm planning to use a blower fan when I set mine up (once I have Duex2)



  • the image in the tweet was a quick blocking up to prove it will work, we're refining the design of the diamond mount before we release it



  • Deckingman,

    One thing thing to consider is adding an insulation blanket between the hot end nozzle interface and the cooling fins and also down a bit to cover the nozzle but exposing the tip area. There are ceramic fiber sheets you can order on Ebay that you cut to shape and you can use high-temp kapton tape to attach to the surfaces. I wrap my hot end block with the insulation and it helps maintain the heat where I need it and not radiate to surrounding areas where I don't want it. It helps improve the temperature stability.



  • @ShadowX:

    Deckingman,

    One thing thing to consider is adding an insulation blanket between the hot end nozzle interface and the cooling fins and also down a bit to cover the nozzle but exposing the tip area. There are ceramic fiber sheets you can order on Ebay that you cut to shape and you can use high-temp kapton tape to attach to the surfaces. I wrap my hot end block with the insulation and it helps maintain the heat where I need it and not radiate to surrounding areas where I don't want it. It helps improve the temperature stability.

    Yes, I've been using a Diamond for quite a while now. Insulation between the nozzle and hot end is absolutely essential. The "stock" RepRap.Me hot end is supplied with 3 layers of "fire blanket". They work well but have a tendency to fray at the edges. When I assemble them, I put the 3 layers of insulation together then stick Kapton tape around the edges. It works but isn't a very elegant solution. There is a user on the RepRap forums who cut some from silicone sheet (as used for cooking trays) and kindly supplied me with some extra samples. I did some back to back tests to compare the two by fitting a thermocouple inside the heat sink in the area of the thread (the heat break). The results aren't conclusive because it is very difficult to position a thermocouple inside the heat break and know that you have exactly the same contact when you do it a second time. Also, there were other differences apart from the insulation as they were two different assemblies. So although the parts were the same specification, there were not the exact same parts, so it is possible that one fan may have bee slightly more efficient than the other. Anyway, for tests I did with the standard "fire blanket" insulation, the temperature I measured at the heat break with the hot end at 200 deg C was 46.5 deg C and was stable after 180 seconds (I carried on for another 120 seconds just to make sure there was no "creep". With the silicone sheet insulation, the temperature was 51.7 deg C and stable after the same time period. However, for reasons given above, I would not like to say that the silicone is definitely worse (and in any case 51.7 deg C is probably acceptable).

    As for wrapping the nozzle in insulation, I understand that some people like to do this. I prefer to use the minimum required print cooling. For me, using cooling only if the layer time is less than 30 seconds, and then not all for the first 5 layers works well. I'm also careful not to have the print cooling directed at the nozzle.



  • @ShadowX:

    It sounds like your hot end should be using a blower fan instead of an axial fan if you need high air flow with higher pressure.

    It doesn't need to be high pressure - just a minimum of 18 c.f.m. I'm using a "normal" 50mm square 24v fan which gives around 22 c.f.m. (can't remember the exact figure). You'd have to be careful how you position a high pressure fan so as to have the airflow coming out through the heat sink fins and not blowing directly on to the brass nozzle.



  • @briangilbert:

    the image in the tweet was a quick blocking up to prove it will work, we're refining the design of the diamond mount before we release it

    Good to hear. You'd probably need a range of mounting options to suit different machines (mine isn't a delta).



  • @deckingman

    Can you provide some info on your printer, how do you have the diamond mounted currently?



  • Some short videos showing some of the unique selling points of the Nimble..

    Pulling force of Nimble: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLDT1MgwAKg

    Ambidextrous: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EVk5cfnrU6Y

    Unobstructed filament changing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ok1W635JVfA



  • As I mentioned on a Reprap post, the area of the smallest opening of the designed shroud is slightly bigger than the opening of the standard shroud used by the Diamond Nozzle.

    I am in the process of tweaking it further and would love to have some more detail on how people intend to use it.
    The fan I am using currently is 60x60x25. I used this fan as it is nice and quiet. If I can find a smaller fan with 18cfm I will use that. That would make my life easier. And as you know, Zesty Technology is all about easy! 🙂

    The difficulty I am currently having is to make the shape such that it can be printed on a normal printer, instead of sending it off to Shapeways. Getting there, but it is a hassle.
    Lykle



  • @briangilbert:

    @deckingman

    Can you provide some info on your printer, how do you have the diamond mounted currently?

    Hi Brian,

    Info on my printer here https://www.duet3d.com/forum/thread.php?id=89

    To see how the Diamond is mounted, follow the link to the pics. The X carriage folder will probably show you what you want. Because the Diamond is such an ungainly beast, I decided to mount it slung between 2 parallel rails, rather than have cantilevered and hanging off one side. That cost me a lot of movement in X and Y so I had to make the printer wider and deeper than I originally intended (600mm x 600mm). That meant that if I had mounted the extruders on the frame, the Bowden tubes would have been around 700mm long. So, I came up with the kind of flying extruder arrangement that you'll see, with the extruders suspended centrally above the bed and 300mm long Bowden tubes( bed is 400mm square). It kind or works but….

    I'm not sure the dual rail idea was such a good one and may end up changing it. (Come to that, I'm not entirely convinced that CoreXY is the way to go and may end up changing it to a simple Cartesian).

    HTH

    Ian

    P.S. What's needed is variant of the diamond hot end that has integral heat sinks that don't stick out at all angles. You've got the drive, now all you need is a path for the filament to go down to a single nozzle and get heated along the way - simple really. While your at it, a mixing chamber for the filament before it goes to the nozzle tip would be a good idea too. The diamond doesn't have one (well it kind of does but when you look at the drawing, it's only 0.4mm dia and 2mm long).



  • @deckingman

    OMG.. that carriage is huge, do you have model of that available? Have PM'd you my email.



  • @briangilbert:

    @deckingman

    OMG.. that carriage is huge, do you have model of that available? Have PM'd you my email.

    Yes it is a tad on the large side. That's me trying to sling it between 2 rails. You need at least 60mm between the rails to clear the heat sinks, then the rails are 20mm wide making it 100mm, then you need to put some wheels somewhere to run on the rails. Smooth rods or linear guides would make it smaller but I wanted to make it all out of Open Builds Vslot.

    I'll check my emails. I have the open scad files of it all and happy to share.

    Ian



  • @ShadowX:

    Wow.. this is the first time I looked into Open Scad. WOW… What a boondoggle of a program. I would never be able to design efficiently with that program as compared to other CAD software. Its almost like a programming software for geeks that is done with CAD.

    Well not exactly for geeks. I'm a 63 year old carpenter and had never used any sort of CAD software in my life, but I had written a bit of code as a hobbyist. I managed to teach myself OpenScad last year, at least enough to design my new printer. The code might not be pretty or as efficient as it could be, but I get the job done. I wouldn't know where to start with more conventional CAD software.


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